Mind Control

Published by MindTech Sweden

Thought Reading, Control, ASPECTS OF BRAIN CHIP IN THE HUMAN BRAIN


Thought Reading and Control

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Artificial Intelligence and European project FACETS (the fast analog computer)

Artificial Intelligence and European project FACETS (the analog computer) provides new medical imaging technique for the brain and the possibility of “reverse engineering the brain with implants”


The government lacks a regulator who can ensure that the laws for ethical review and informed consent for research on humans with brain implants followed. The shortage means that the Government neither can satisfy the requirements of the conventions on human rights and bioethics incumbent government, a precarious situation for European citizens.Graduate Abuse can happen completely without insight with brain-machine interface and e-science.

When science produces results that are changing the neurobiological description of human consciousness, what is left of the notions that humans have free will and personal responsibility for their actions? New knowledge about the neural basis of morality is blowing also renewed debate about the existence of a universal morality. These questions are discussed within the field of neuroethics, a subject that deals with the philosophical and ethical issues raised by neuroscience and cognitive research. (Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics )

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Scientists have the knowledge of the fMRI and PET cameras, among other things learned where in the brain electrodes (implants) must be placed to the E-science visualization of human perception.

In recent decades meetings between nanotechnology, information technology, biotechnology and neuroscience have produced a new research area, which is developing new, unknown products and services. We are facing a new revolution, which is already running with the launch of mind characterized universal computer. A unique perceptual tool, not only raise awareness for our minds but also imitate them: sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch.

CNN UN stands for Cellular Neural / Non-linear Network – Universal Machine. And there are three innovators Tamás Rosk, Leon Chua, and Angel Rodriguez Vazques, who are the pioneers behind the “revolution of the senses”. They have introduced a new computer policy, which differs from the digital model magazine sparkling, lower standards.

We’ve said ‘yes’ without any major protests to the electronic age “first wave”. When we are referring to the cheap chip that made ​​the PC to every man’s tools.
“The second wave” came creeping – also without objection. A series of inexpensive electronic means such as lasers, the Internet was built for broadband and mobile phone, which is now self-evident part of our everyday lives.
In the “third wave”, it also applies connections to the brain, called brain-computer integration (brain-Macine interface) and related network-based human-machine language. This means both huge benefits but also disadvantages to humans. The disadvantages include complex legal implications, concerning the identity and integrity.

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Info-Bionic challenging society. In the biological field, we first familiarize ourselves with “smart” devices and tools, which stimulates and motivates the human central nervous system. But it also outlines smart prostheses implanted in the living organism. The direct contact between these “smart” nano-implants and our central nervous system, pointing towards a symbiosis (living together), between brain and computer. This new realm, which is named for info-bionic, challenge course, the traditional values ​​of society and its ethical standards.

Computer scientists also predicts that within the next few years neural interfaces will be designed so that it will not only increase the dynamic range of the senses, but will also enhance memory and enable “cyberthink” that invisible communication built on ideas.

Direct connection to the brain: It is without doubt the most complicated task. Here are dangers as great as the opportunities. This is also bioethics responsibility far greater than in those areas, which so far we have touched. But really, all mined areas and the limitation of the commercial profit hunger is therefore highly desirable.

Future Technologies, Future and Emerging Technologies – FET. The basis for this strategy is the focus on the future of Information and Communication Technology – ICT

Here are some quotes from the EU’s 7th Framework Programme.
“Can one example understand and exploit the ways in which social and biological systems organize themselves and evolve, will pave the way for the development of new opportunities for next-generation software and network technologies. “
“The understanding of how the human brain works not only leads to innovations in medicine, but it also creates new models for energy, fault-tolerant and adaptive computer technology.”
“FET support example, been crucial for research in quantum information technology in Europe. This technique promises an enormous computing power far beyond the capacity of ordinary computers, and also completely secure communications. By early investments have FET program made ​​a decisive contribution to Europe now is a world leader in the field. “
“In the FET area carries, in addition, pioneering work on new ideas as artificial living cells, synthetic biology, chemical communication, collective intelligence and two-way interface between brain and machine.”

Research Council has published a booklet packed facts pocket “where gold glitters blue” on the new nanoscience. This new technology opens up tremendous opportunities, but also contains a number of ethical issues. Sweden Europe and the rest of the world currently lacks clear ethical guidelines.

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Here are quotes from the book written by Ulf Görman, professor of ethics and religious studies at Lund University.
Nanoelectronics! A number of ethical declarations have been introduced to prevent abuse of people, including the Declaration of Helsinki. In 1997, also signed the EU Member States’ Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine “in the Spanish city of Oviedo.
-These declarations have been added in response to the abuse of people who were in World War II. Oviedo Convention and other European rules have resulted in new legislation in Sweden. For example, the Privacy Act, which came into force in 1998, and the Act on Ethical Review of Research Involving Humans, which came into force in 2004. Ulf Görman believe that when we do a retrospective, it is easy for us to distinguish between unethical and ethical good research.

Now we open the doors to an unknown area where we do not know how to apply ethics.What should it be and what should not be allowed when you can make the electrode implant that can both influence and learn of the brain? He takes up the example of studying learning and memory. ”Micro Implants can provide unprecedented opportunities to understand how we learn and remember things, and hence why we forget and find it difficult to learn. While it may be perceived as a form of abuse that like that look in our most private mental world “.

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Thought Control – a new ethical problem. Being able to connect the human brain to a computer via electrodes open, of course, frightening possibilities. Will it be feasible to control a person’s thoughts?
There are important ethical aspects of this. One could of course theoretically able to control brain functions and modify people’s personality. For example, making them more or less prone to aggression or to increase learning ability by adding the chronic stimulation. It’s like with everything else, in that the knowledge is there, you can use it in many ways. Ulf Görman

Swedish and EU researchers possess, in secret, a privilege of the commercial profit hunger to develop these advanced technologies. Researchers may, without obtaining the informed consent and without the approval of an ethics board inject nanotechnology and research on humans, completely “Top Secret”. This is the way to the products, software and network technology is approaching patent application and a commercial launch of the research results, is on its way.

Research where informed consent could not be obtained and an approval of an ethics board would not be due to the physical and psychological risks for the individual is totally unknown, will not stop Swedish an EU researchers.

Withholding research reports on the development of new technologies means that the existing diagnosis in psychiatry and the judicial system disposes of the victims of abuse research, which makes these instances of “missing traders” for the illegal research. In this way, researchers will escape detection, and no responsibility. In nanotechnology and human-machine integration is the market and the power that controls, not ethics.

Because of that situation, people are slaughtered with impunity as research objects with the new technologies. When the legislative and diagnostics are missing, the computer-brain integration, it follows that attempts objects during research time exposed to serious torture.Graduate abuses have naturally resulted in the subjects in pure frustration committed ensanity acts and ended up in prison or in psychiatric care. Had the law existed and functioned, this research instead to point out that scientists are forced to drive people “across the border” and charged to the judiciary and mental health.

Although concrete evidence because of evaded research reports are currently lacking, so will future research and patents, of course, be able to uncover this hidden aggravated criminal research.

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When the government knowingly or unknowingly withholds itself from scientific information will result in a right wrecked Sweden.
People can during the long development of the computer brains of the Internet-based human-machine language is not heard. This leads to pure execution is under development to cover up the criminal teknologys rampage.

How much longer must people illegally injected at the Swedish hospital?
How much longer must people’s brains are allowed to “cut” for the enslavement of the scientists’ services without compensation?
How much longer must people assaulted, death and / or misdiagnosed before the government makes sure to meet the conventions on human rights and bioethics?
Who takes responsibility for the children that are left homeless when the researchers injected and linked up attempts of people who have family, social welfare and labor?
How many people have died earlier in scientific experiments because of lack of transparency in the Swedish neuroscience hunt for power and money?
How many ensanity acts, traffic accidents, deaths in maternity hospitals, and even political murder has been diagnosed, but no account is taken of nanotechnology and the many years of development of technologies for computer-brain integration and the study of human behavior?

Five years of direct connectivity of the brain, the pattern recognition of brain neurons to cognitive behavior (perception), designed with artificial intelligence in a multimedia connection between brain implant and computers.

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By Magnus Olsson (Mindtech) Sweden


Ethical Assessment of Implantable Brain Chips
Ellen M. McGee and G. Q. Maguire, Jr. My purpose is to initiate a discussion of the ethics of implanting computer chips in the brain and to raise some initial ethical and social questions. Computer scientists predict that within the next twenty years neural interfaces will be designed that will not only increase the dynamic range of senses, but will also enhance memory and enable “cyberthink” — invisible communication with others. This technology will facilitate consistent and constant access to information when and where it is needed. The ethical evaluation in this paper focuses on issues of safely and informed consent, issues of manufacturing and scientific responsibility, anxieties about the psychological impacts of enhancing human nature, worries about possible usage in children, and most troubling, issues of privacy and autonomy. Inasmuch as this technology is fraught with perilous implications for radically changing human nature, for invasions of privacy and for governmental control of individuals, public discussion of its benefits and burdens should be initiated, and policy decisions should be made as to whether its development should be proscribed or regulated, rather than left to happenstance, experts and the vagaries of the commercial market.

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ABSTRACT:

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The future may well involve the reality of science fiction’s cyborg, persons who have developed some intimate and occasionally necessary relationship with a machine. It is likely that implantable computer chips acting as sensors, or actuators, may soon assist not only failing memory, but even bestow fluency in a new language, or enable “recognition” of previously unmet individuals. The progress already made in therapeutic devices, in prosthetics and in computer science indicate that it may well be feasible to develop direct interfaces between the brain and computers.

Worldwide there are at least three million people living with artificial implants. In particular, research on the cochlear implant and retinal vision have furthered the development of interfaces between neural tissues and silicon substrate micro probes. The cochlear implant, which directly stimulates the auditory nerve, enables over 10,000 totally deaf people to hear sound; the retinal implantable chip for prosthetic vision may restore vision to the blind. Research on prosthetic vision has proceeded along two paths: 1) retinal implants, which avoid brain surgery and link a camera in eyeglass frames via laser diodes to a healthy optic nerve and nerves to the retina, and 2) cortical implants, which require brain surgery and the pneumatic insertion of electrodesinto the brain to penetrate the visual cortex and produce highly localized stimulation.

The latest stage in the evolution towards the implantable brain chip involves combining these advances in prostheses technology with developments in computer science. The linkage of smaller, lighter, and more powerful computer systems with radio technologies will enable users to access information and communicate anywhere or anytime. Through miniaturization of components, systems have been generated that are wearable and nearly invisible, so that individuals, supported by a personal information structure, can move about and interact freely, as well as, through networking, share experiences with others. The wearable computer project envisions users accessing the Remembrance Agent of a large communally based data source.

Wearables and body-nets are intermediate technologies; the logical next step in this development is the implantable brain chip, direct neural interfacing. As early as 1968, Nicholas Negroponte, presently director of MIT’s Media Lab, first prophesied this symbiosis between mankind and machine. His colleague, Professor Gershenfeld, asserts that “in 10 years, computers will be everywhere; in 20 years, embedded by bioengineers in our bodies…” Neither visionary professes any qualms about this project, which they expect to alter human nature itself. “Suddenly technology has given us powers with which we can manipulate not only external reality — the physical world — but also, and much more portentously, ourselves.” Once networked the result will be a “collective consciousness”, “the hive mind.” “The hive mind…is about taking all these trillions of cells in our skulls that make individual consciousness and putting them together and arriving at a new kind of consciousness that transcends all the individuals.”

The technology for implantable devices is becoming available, and at prices that make such systems very cost effective. Three stages of introduction of such devices can be delineated. The earliest adopters will be those with a disability, who will use this as a more powerful prosthetic device. The next stage, represents the movement from therapy to enhancement, and it is at this point that ethical evaluation becomes imperative. One of the first groups of non-disabled “volunteers” will probably be the professional military, where the use of an implanted computing and communication device with new interfaces to weapons, information, and communications could be lifesaving. The third group of users will probably be those involved in very information intensive businesses, who will use these devices to develop an expanded information transfer capability.

As intelligence or sensory “amplifiers”, the implantable chip will generate at least four benefits: 1) it will increase the dynamic range of senses, enabling, for example, seeing IR, UV, and chemical spectra; 2) it will enhance memory; 3) it will enable “cyberthink” — invisible communication with others when making decisions, and 4) it will enable consistent and constant access to information where and when it is needed. For many these enhancements will produce major improvements in the quality of life, or their survivability, or their performance in a job. The first prototype devices for these improvements in human functioning should be available in five years, with the military prototypes starting within ten years, and information workers using prototypes within fifteen years; general adoption will take roughly twenty to thirty years. The brain chip will probably function as a prosthetic cortical implant. The user’s visual cortex will receive stimulation from a computer based either on what a camera sees or based on an artificial “window” interface.

Not every computer scientist views such prospects with equanimity. Michael Dertouzos writes, “even if it would someday be possible to convey such higher-level information to the brain — and that is a huge technical “If” — we should not do it. Bringing light impulses to the visual cortex of a blind person would justify such an intrusion, but unnecessarily tapping into the brain is a violation of our bodies, of nature, and for many, of God’s design.”

This succinctly formulates the essentialist and creationist argument against the implantable chip. Fears of tampering with human nature are widespread; the theme that nature is good and technology evil, that the power to recreate oneself is overreaching hubris, and that reengineering humanity can only result in disaster, is a familiar response to each new control that man exercises. The mystique of the natural is fueled by the romantic world view of a benign period when humans lived in harmony with nature. However attractive, it is probable that this vision is faulty inasmuch as man has always used technology to survive, and to enhance life; the use of technology is natural to man. Thus this negative response to the prospect of implantable chips is certainly inadequate, although it points to a need to evaluate the technology in terms of the good or evil possibilities for its use by men, or governments.

The call not to “play God” is also familiar, and suffers from the same difficulties articulated by David Hume. This critique relies on a religious sense that improving on the design of creation insults the Creator. In particular, it proposes that attempts to alter the functioning of the brain for purposes of creating a superior human being can be decried as usurping God’s power. To be persuasive this argument must depend on a restrictive, even for religionists, view of creation, one that sees no role for human creativity.

GrandVision

Rejection of wiring brains directly to a computer also stems from a desire for bodily integrity, and intuitions about the sanctity of the body. Thus, many accept the invasion of the organic by the mechanical for curative purposes, but feel that such uses for enhancement are wrong. This conviction, that respect for humans requires the physical integrity of the body is a version of “the inviolability-of persons view”, a deontological position. Using this standard, a distinction is drawn between therapeutic and enhancement procedures; “An intervention that is life-saving, rehabilitative, or otherwise therapeutic can be consistent with the principle that the physical integrity of the body should be preserved even if it involves a bodily ‘mutilation’ or intrusion, provided that it promotes the integrity of the whole.” Implantable chips that amplify the senses, or enhance memory or networking capacities would, thus, be suspect. For others, however, there is no bright line between therapy and enhancement — how deficient does my memory have to be before it would be ethical to wire my brain to a computer? — and the argument is too weak to preclude the use of this technology, anymore than it is possible to proscribe cosmetic surgery, or the use of mood-improving drugs if the benefits seems to outweigh the medical risks. However, even if we discount the force of these three arguments, there are a myriad of other technical, ethical and social concerns to consider before proceeding with implantable chips. The areas of concern for technology assessment are extensive, including risks, appropriateness, societal impact, costs and equity issues and need evaluation by a multi disciplinary team. Study of this device would seem to need participants from at least the fields of computer science, biophysics, medicine, law, philosophy, public policy and international economy. Unlike the scientific community at the advent of genetic technologies, the computer industry has not, as yet, engaged in a public dialogue of these promising, but risky technologies. This avoidance of discussion, and simple reliance upon principles of free scientific inquiry and the market economy is itself a moral stance requiring justification.

Ethical appraisal of implantable computer chips should assess at least the following areas of concern: issues of safety and informed consent, issues of manufacturing and scientific responsibility, anxieties about the psychological impacts of enhancing human nature, worries about possible usage in children, and most troublesome, issues of privacy and autonomy. As is the case in evaluation of any future technology, it is unlikely that we can reliably predict all effects. Nevertheless, the potential for harm must be considered.

The most obvious and basic problems involve safety. Evaluation of the costs and benefits of these implants requires a consideration of the surgical and long term risks. One question, — whether the difficulties with development of non-toxic materials will allow long term usage? — should be answered in studies on therapeutic options and thus, not be a concern for enhancement usages. However, it is conceivable that there should be a higher standard for safety when technologies are used for enhancement rather than therapy, and this issue needs public debate. Whether the informed consent of recipients should be sufficient reason for permitting implementation is questionable in view of the potential societal impact. Other issues such as the kinds of warranties users should receive, and the liability responsibilities if quality control of hard/soft/firmware is not up to standard, could be addressed by manufacturing regulation. Provisions should be made to facilitate upgrades since users presumably would not want multiple operations, or to be possessors of obsolete systems. Manufacturers must understand and devise programs for teaching users how to implement the new systems. There will be a need to generate data on individual implant recipient usefulness, and whether all users benefit equally. Additional practical problems with ethical ramifications include whether there will be a competitive market in such systems and if there will be any industry-wide standards for design of the technology.

One of the least controversial uses of this enhancement technology will be its implementation as therapy. It is possible that the technology could be used to enable those who are naturally less cognitively endowed to achieve on a more equitable basis. Certainly, uses of the technology to remediate retardation or to replace lost memory faculties in cases of progressive neurological disease, could become a covered item in health care plans. Enabling humans to maintain species typical functioning would probably be viewed as a desirable, even required, intervention, although this may become a constantly changing standard. The costs of implementing this technology needs to be weighed against the costs of impairment, although it may be that decisions should be made on the basis of rights rather than usefulness.

Consideration also needs to be given to the psychological impact of enhancing human nature. Will the use of computer-brain interfaces change our conception of man and our sense of identity? If people are actually connected via their brains the boundaries between self and community will be considerably diminished. The pressures to act as a part of the whole rather than as a single isolated individual would be increased; the amount and diversity of information might overwhelm, and the sense of self as a unique and isolated individual would be changed.

Since usage may also engender a human being with augmented sensory capacities, the implications, even if positive, need consideration. Supersensory sight will see radar, infrared and ultraviolet images, augmented hearing will detect softer and higher and lower pitched sounds, enhanced smell will intensify our ability to discern scents, and an amplified sense of touch will enable discernment of environmental stimuli like changes in barometric pressure. These capacities would change the “normal” for humans, and would be of exceptional application in situations of danger, especially in battle. As the numbers of enhanced humans increase, today’s normal range might be seen as subnormal, leading to the medicalization of another area of life. Thus, substantial questions revolve around whether there should be any limits placed upon modifications of essential aspects of the human species. Although defining human nature is notoriously difficult, man’s rational powers have traditionally been viewed as his claim to superiority and the center of personal identity. Changing human thoughts and feeling might render the continued existence of the person problematical. If one accepts, as most cognitive scientists do, “the materialist assertion that mind is an emergent phenomenon from complex matter, … cybernetics may one day provide the same requisite level of complexity as a brain.” On the other hand, not all philosophers espouse the materialist contention and use of these technologies certainly will impact discussions about the nature of personal identity, and the traditional mind-body problem. Modifying the brain and its powers could change our psychic states, altering both the self-concept of the user, and our understanding of what it means to be human. The boundary between me “the physical self” and me “the perceptory/intellectual self” could change as the ability to perceive and interact expands far beyond what can be done with video conferencing. The boundaries of the real and virtual worlds may blur, and a consciousness wired to the collective and to the accumulated knowledge of mankind would surely impact the individual’s sense of self. Whether this would lead to bestowing greater weight to collective responsibilities and whether this would be beneficial are unknown.

Changes in human nature would become more pervasive if the altered consciousness were that of children. In an intensely competitive society, knowledge is often power. Parents are driven to provide the very best for their children. Will they be able to secure implants for their children, and if so, how will that change the already unequal lottery of life? Standards for entrance into schools, gifted programs and spelling bees – all would be affected. The inequalities produced might create a demand for universal coverage of these devices in health care plans, further increasing costs to society. However, in a culture such as ours, with different levels of care available on the basis of ability to pay, it is plausible to suppose that implanted brain chips will be available only to those who can afford a substantial investment, and that this will further widen the gap between the haves and the have-not. A major anxiety should be the social impact of implementing a technology that widens the divisions not only between individuals, and genders, but also, between rich and poor nations. As enhancements become more widespread, enhancement becomes the norm, and there is increasing social pressure to avail oneself of the “benefit.”Thus, even those who initially shrink from the surgery may find it becomes a necessity, and the consent part of “informed consent”would become subject to manipulation.

Beyond these more imminent prospects is the possibility that in thirty years, “it will be possible to capture data presenting all of a human being’s sensory experiences on a single tiny chip implanted in the brain.” This data would be collected by biological probes receiving electrical impulses, and would enable a user to recreate experiences, or even to transplant memory chips from one brain to another. In this eventuality, psychological continuity of personal identity would be disrupted with indisputable ramifications . Would the resulting person have the identities of other persons?

The most frightening implication of this technology is the grave possibility that it would facilitate totalitarian control of humans. In a prescient projection of experimental protocols, George Annas writes of the “project to implant removable monitoring devices at the base of the brain of neonates in three major teaching hospitals….The devices would not only permit us to locate all the implantees at any time, but could be programmed in the future to monitor the sound around them and to play subliminal messages directly to their brains.” Using such technology governments could control and monitor citizens. In a free society this possibility may seem remote, although it is not implausible to project usage for children as an early step. Moreover, in the military environment the advantages of augmenting capacities to create soldiers with faster reflexes, or greater accuracy, would exert strong pressures for requiring enhancement. When implanted computing and communication devices with interfaces to weapons, information, and communication systems become possible, the military of the democratic societies might require usage to maintain a competitive advantage. Mandated implants for criminals are a foreseeable possibility even in democratic societies. Policy decisions will arise about this usage, and also about permitting usage, if and when it becomes possible, to affect specific behaviors. A paramount worry involves who will control the technology and what will be programmed; this issue overlaps with uneasiness about privacy issues, and the need for control and security of communication links. Not all the countries of the world prioritize autonomy, and the potential for sinister invasions of liberty and privacy are alarming.

In view of the potentially devastating implications of the implantable brain chip should its development and implementation be prohibited? This is, of course, the question that open dialogue needs to address, and it raises the disputed topic of whether technological development can be resisted, or whether the empirical slippery slope will necessarily result in usage, in which case regulation might still be feasible. Issues raised by the prospect of implantable brain chips are hard ones, because the possibilities for both good and evil are so great. The issues are too significant to leave to happenstance, computer scientists, or the commercial market. It is vital that world societies assess this technology and reach some conclusions about what course they wish to take.

Magnus Olsson

Magnus Olsson SWEDEN (STOCKHOLM)

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9 Replies

  1. Jonny, Boston U.S.A Mar 29th 2010

    Wideband Link
    The implants used by Unity to achieve group consciousness. Unlike an ordinary neurointerface it connects to most of the cerebral cortex and has a much higher bandwidth. It can send and receive signals not just of primary sensory and motor information but also higher order associations and thoughts. Since each human has an individual “mental language” sophisticated translation systems and much training is required before digital telepathy is possible. Wideband links are also used by the Net Transcendence and Next Step Foundation in their experiments with expanding the human mind. One of the most controversial and interesting applications is to let software rewrite parts of the cortex; theoretically this could be the ultimate psychodesign, even if it is currently extremely crude. Some AIs are apparently interested in using this approach to “download” themselves to physical bodies.

    Common brands: Unity Neurotechnologies Wideband Link™, BridgeTech Neocortex Interface™.

    Medial forebrain pacemaker
    An implant in the motivation and pleasure centres that is controlled by the owner’s neurocomputer. It is illegal on Nova and very addictive: users quickly become hooked on anything that activates it. It can be used together with behaviour therapy to change habits and personality, a kind of bionic psychodesign: the user links the implant to some reward evaluator (such as a monitoring AI) that rewards certain actions. The result is a strong increase in rewarded actions, which can be used to produce extreme ambition or tenacity. Unfortunately the temptations and dangers of use are huge.

    John U.S.A

  2. U.S.A May 7th 2010

    “We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts.
    With our thoughts, we make the world.”

    -Gotama Buddha, 563-483 BCE

  3. Prof. M SWEDEN May 7th 2010

    At first sight ICT implants are ethically unproblematic if we think for instance about cardiac pacemakers. However, although particular ICT implants may be used to repair deficient bodily capabilities, others are ethically more problematic, particularly if such devices are accessible via digital networks. ICT implants, due to their network capability could be misused in several ways for all kinds of social surveillance or manipulation.

    The idea of placing ICT devices “under our skin” in order not just to repair but even to enhance human capabilities gives rise to science fiction visions with threat and/or benefit characteristics. However, in some cases, the implantation of microchips with the potential for individual and social forms of control is already taking place.

  4. Tending to civilize human experimentation (HE) intentionally disregards law and ethics. Are existing laws providing sufficient defense against experiments done without consent? What chance does a person stand in the court of law when making a case against the government, industry and military for illegal experimentation? And to make the matter worse, how does a victim take legal action when statements or proofs are non-admissible as testimony in a court of law.

  5. yes, really frightening stuff. I can’t believe no trails at least since they say it’s the same drug. A radio transmitter really makes it a LOT different. I don’t want a Radio transmitter in my body. It seems that we are to be watched, tracked and made sure that we do what someone else says we must. There was a hearing this Spring in the Senate on Aging discussing just how great this all would be!! They are trying to have broadband over the electric wires, pills that track, a medical ‘force’ that makes sure you take your medications etc. This is just one of the first times I saw it mainstream. We really do have to stop this!

  6. Y Cinar Jan 31st 2011

    Dear Sir/Madam,
    According to these known and important technologies, there is very little number of criminal cases that reported in these pages. One explanation of this condition on your page is threatening of that people by paranoid evaluation. Therefore you should confirm to public that how these criminal devices are discovered on a body? Which way could show these chips; traditional X-ray imaging, Computerized tomography, magnetic resonance tomography or ultrasound technology? There are many types of analyzer for electromagnetic spectrum, and one of them should trap the EM propagation of these devices (chips). Some of these electromagnetic receivers (analyzers) should locate these chips by directed antenna. Is there any deflection (spike or increased local activity) of EEG traces of these persons? Which level of power and frequency of electromagnetic resonance could broke these chips like interactions of magnetic resonance devices and mobile phones? Please confirm us that how could be explored these devices on the body?
    Best regards
    Y Cinar

  7. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 18, 2011
    Contact: Sharon Boston sboston@umm.edu 410-328-8919

    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE RADIOLOGISTS COLLABORATE WITH IBM TO BRING “WATSON” COMPUTER’S BRAIN POWER TO HEALTH CARE

    Dr. Eliot Siegel

    The University of Maryland School of Medicine is one of only two universities working with IBM to test the advanced analytics of the company’s “Watson” computer for potential health care applications.

    The computer program, which may best known for besting two top champions on the TV show Jeopardy! in February 2011, has shown an amazing ability to comprehend human language, a barrier that has been a challenge for computer designers for many years. Watson can also absorb huge databases and then mine that information quickly.

    Eliot L. Siegel, MD, professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, will be leading the project for the School of Medicine. He says, “The system also has the potential to ingest information from a single patient’s electronic medical record in one facility or potentially multiple facilities and also to acquire information from multiple patients. It then has the ability to form multiple hypotheses in a manner similar to the way in which it understands the Jeopardy question and forms multiple hypotheses.”

    Related Content

    Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
    Baltimore Sun Article Highlights “Watson” in Health Care
    Associated Press Reports “Watson” Move to Health Care
    IBM Reports “Watson” Collaboration with Health Care Industry
    IBM Video: Perspectives of Watson on Healthcare

    In the health care setting, the Watson technology may be a powerful tool, helping doctors diagnose patients. Dr. Siegel suggests the technology has the potential to result in a renaissance in the application of “artificial intelligence” in medical data mining, data analysis and decision support.

    He adds, “I see Watson’s capabilities not as replacement for physicians but as an adjunct and tool to organize, highlight and prioritize information to make a physician more efficient and effective, and improve patient safety. In a manner similar to a physician who works with residents and fellows and medical students, our physician of the future might utilize this tool to provide improved patient care more cost effectively.”

    Dr. Siegel directs the Maryland Imaging Research Technologies Laboratory at the SOM. He also is head of imaging at the Baltimore VA Medical Center.

    Columbia University is the other institution working on the health care applications for the Watson system.

  8. kent schake Mar 9th 2011

    you people make this sound like it is just coming around it has been around for a long time. the cia was putting chip as you call it in new born babies with out the parents knowing. now i think they cant do that no more so they are tring to see want the people think. why dont you people tell every body the truth

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